Welcome to GTS


Welcome to GTS Electric’s new blog.  I will regularly be posting news and updates from GTS Electric Company.

What does GTS stand for?  Genuine Trustworthy Service!

Who is GTS?  We are a hard working, family operated business, offering affordable solutions for your commercial, critical power and residential electrical needs. State licensed and insured, we make it our business to ensure your project is completed professionally, on time and under budget.

Do we charge for estimates?  No.  Estimates are free!

What is our mission?  We are dedicated to seeing our costumers satisfied with everything we do on your site, from design/layout, to installation, to inspection/commisioning.

Now that you know who GTS is, call Tom at  262-367-2487 to find out how we can help you with all your electrical needs.

Stand-By Generators



Stand-By Generators

Written By Joseph Farmer, President of GTS Electric Company

Q: The last major storm knocked out my electric power for days. I’m wondering if I should invest in a portable generator or a standby generator. What’s the difference in these home generators? How do you determine what size electric generator to purchase? Do you think I can install a standby generator myself as I’m pretty handy?

A: That’s a great question! I understand where you are coming from. When I was in the Navy a hurricane knocked out the power to our house and it wasn’t restored for nearly two weeks! (You’d be amazed at just how many meals can be prepared on a charcoal grill!) Electricity is almost as important as oxygen in some respects. When it’s there, you don’t even think about it, but when it’s gone, you get desperate in a hurry.

Home generators are gaining in popularity for many reasons. After this storm event, I was bound and determined to get a standby generator, especially for the winter season when vicious ice storms can create power outages for weeks in some remote areas.

There’s a huge difference between portable generators and standby generators. A portable generator is one you can move around. The type most homeowners recognize are those that are the size of a medium picnic cooler and are powered by a small gasoline engine. Contractors often use these on job-sites when regular electricity is not yet connected.

These small portable generators are not designed to power an entire house. The intention is for you to run one or several extension cords from the generator directly to the appliance you wish to power. You may connect it to a refrigerator for a few hours, then a window air conditioner, and maybe a few table lamps. Forget about connecting all of your appliances at once to a small portable generator. It simply will not work

A standby generator is a larger fixed device that resembles an outdoor air conditioning compressor. They are capable of generating enough power to keep many essential electrical devices operating at once, or you can invest in a standby generator that can operate every electrical appliance and light in your house all at once.

The standby generators are not meant to be installed by a homeowner. Not only do you have to connect a fuel source to it such as propane or natural gas, but you also have to hard wire the generator into your electrical system. This is fairly complex and best done by professionals. What’s more, you need to install a sophisticated transfer switch with a separate electrical panel that contains the electrical circuits that will be powered when the generator turns on.

One primary difference between a standby generator and a portable one is the standby generator will turn itself on when the primary electric to your home is knocked out. This is accomplished by the transfer switch, and can have your lights back on in as little as ten seconds. When the utility company finally restores your power, the transfer switch senses this and shuts off your generator.

Extension cords are not used with a standby generator. All of your appliances remain plugged into their wall outlets. The electrician, with your input, decides which circuits in your home to connect to the generator. This allows you to purchase the correct-sized generator. If you decide to power just a part of your home, the other areas will be dark and off the grid. Think about what appliances and rooms of your house you can survive in until the utility company gets power back to your home

Some standby generators come with software that allows you to check the status of your generator if you’re not at home. This software can also communicate with you or a service company if it senses something is wrong that might cause the generator to fail in the event of a power outage. This allows you to have it repaired so that it will be working when you need it most.

Portable generators can get you by in an emergency, but they are not in the same league as a standby generator. In an emergency, you need to drag out the portable generator, and safely string all the extension cords. You then need to add fuel to the engine on a regular basis day and night. It can be a hassle. You also need to be very careful about placing it near the partially open window or door that the cords pass through. The carbon monoxide fumes from the engine exhaust can drift indoors.

Standby generators require periodic maintenance as they contain engines that spin the actual generator. Often you can do this maintenance yourself. An excellent example of recommended maintenance for your generator can be found on the following web-site(http://www.cumminspower.com/www/literature/technicalpapers/PT-7004-Maintenance-en.pdf)  If you are the type of person who does your own oil changes on your car, the check list to maintain you generator will seem very familiar.

We are available to install and maintain residential, commercial or industrial generators and the associated electrical system they protect. Give us a call today if we can be of service at 262 367 2GTS (2487) !

Breaker Panel Upgrades-When is it time?



Breaker Panel Upgrades-When is it time?

Written By Joseph Farmer, President of GTS Electric Company

 

Q: We are in the process of selling our home and our realtor wants us to upgrade to a 200 Amp electrical service-is this necessary?

A: Today, Americans use an incredible amount of electricity. The demand for electrical current is a hundred times greater for the average household than it was half a century ago. The way a new home is equipped for electricity has changed drastically since then.

For instance, these days an air conditioning system can use more electricity than the whole house would have fifty years ago. And, because of all the new technology constantly being introduced into the world today, it’s not uncommon for us to have some sort of electronic device, be it a television, computer, printer, or some other electricity-eating gadget, powered on somewhere in the house twenty four hours a day.

And that doesn’t include the items we own that are perpetually turned on and drawing power, even when we’re not using them. All of this electricity running through a home puts a lot of stress on the home wiring, as well as on its electric panel.

Plus, today’s homes have many more “plug-ins” for appliances, electronics, and such, which are in much greater demand today than they were even 20 years ago. The fact is, if your home is over 20 years old, you should definitely look into upgrading your service panel.

And if you’re using extension cords and power strips so you can plug several things into one receptacle, it’s definitely time to look into getting a service panel upgrade. Doing so will allow each circuit to run straight from the distribution panel. It’s simply too much of a fire hazard to have so many things running from one place.

Here are some basic guidelines that will help you decide if upgrading your service panel is something you should do immediately. If your house has less than 200 amps of electricity available with the current service panel, or if it has screw in fuses, you most likely need an upgrade. In fact, most of the time, an insurance company won’t let you buy insurance for a house that still has the “screw-in” type fuses.

Another tell tale sign, and a pretty obvious one, that you need to upgrade your service panel is not being able to use one appliance, such as your microwave, without having to turn off another, like your coffee pot, so that you don’t “trip a breaker”. In this case, it’s likely your circuits are overloaded meaning it’s definitely time for a service panel upgrade.

A Very Important side note: Always consult a licensed professional electrician  to do this work on your home or business. Service upgrades are far too dangerous to be “do it yourself” projects because of the fire hazards they pose, and because of the risk of electrocution.

We would be happy to take care of this for you! Give us a call at 262 367 2487 for a free consultation and estimate!